Fin Guide

Choosing the correct fins for your board is essential for determining how the board will perform. Shapers create boards with the intention of them being ridden in a specific way. Therefore, different boards and surfing conditions require different fins and fin set ups.

Fin design and set-up can be endlessly experimented with, but before you start testing your options, it’s important to know how each type of fin and their features affect performance.

THE SIZE OF THE FIN

The overall size of the fin makes the biggest impact in your boards performance. The larger the surface area, the more hold the fin provides, and fin categories are also broken down into weight ranges. A large fin provides more “hold” and control in bigger surf. A small fin is more loose and forgiving, however lacks the control for large surf. A medium set provides an in-between “all-rounder” performance.

THE BASE OF THE FIN

The base of the fin attaches to the board. The wider and longer the fin base, the more drive it will provide. The shorter or more narrow the fin base, the easier the turns and more release.

THE DEPTH OF THE FIN

The depth of the fin refers to how tall or long it is, and how deep into the water the fin goes. The deeper the fin, the more stability and hold. The shallower the fin, the more release when performing turns. The shallower the fin, the more release when performing turns.Start with an outline of topics and identify highlights, which can be applied to whatever subject you plan on discussing.

 FIN RAKE

Rake refers to how far back the fin tilts. Rake equals hold, and vertical/upright equals tighter pivots. The more rake a fin has, the less pivot it will provide. This is useful in bigger surf. A more upright fin will pivot more and is more useful in smaller surf.

The shallower the fin, the more release when performing turns.Start with an outline of topics and identify highlights, which can be applied to whatever subject you plan on discussing. See picture shown.

FIN FOIL

Foil of a fin refers to the shape of the fin from front to back. Different shapes create different kinds of lift under the board. Generally, fins are thicker in the centre, and taper towards the edges. Side fins are generally flat, with inward curves on the inside and foil on the outside.

Centre fins have equal foil on both sides. The shallower the fin, the more release when performing turns.Start with an outline of topics and identify highlights, which can be applied to whatever subject you plan on discussing. See below picture.

FIN CANT

The cant of a fin refers to the angle outwards a fin produces in relation to the board. A straight up and down fin has “zero cant” and will be faster down the line, but less responsive for turns. A more angled cant will be more responsive during turns because the board becomes more titled through the rails.

The shallower the fin, the more release when performing turns.Start with an outline of topics and identify highlights, which can be applied to whatever subject you plan on discussing.

FIN TOE

The toe refers to the angle of the fin pointing inwards towards the stringer of the board. Side fins usually angle more inwards to create pressure on the outside foil. This creates a more responsive feel. See below picture.